Divine Command Theory and The Problem of Evil

The classic construal of the problem of evil raises the question of the logical compatibility and evidential probability of God’s existence given the conspicuous prevalence of human and animal suffering. In this paper, I wish to address objections to God’s existence based on the contention that the prevalence of suffering is logically incompatible with an … Continue reading Divine Command Theory and The Problem of Evil

Is There a Theological Defeater for Anthropogenic Global Warming?

I recently had the pleasure of hearing Professor Craig Nicholson - director of the MS program in sustainability science at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst – give a series of talks to a group of Yale graduate students on the role of the Christian scholar in secular academia. While his chief aim in these presentations … Continue reading Is There a Theological Defeater for Anthropogenic Global Warming?

Recovering the Sacred: Heidegger, The Thing and the Work of Art

“Homelessness is coming to be the destiny of the world.”                   – Letter on Humanism               What remnant of the sacred – a once dominant theme in Western civilization – remains open to us in the twenty-first century? Has our increasingly secular age relegated the sacred to obscurity and irrelevance, or does it still … Continue reading Recovering the Sacred: Heidegger, The Thing and the Work of Art

Wittgenstein on Ethics and Faith

In his few published remarks concerning the nature of religious faith, Wittgenstein calls into question the function of historical events in the grounding of religious convictions. In a series of lectures and notebook entries dating from the decade between 1930 and 1940, he argues that language operates uniquely when used to communicate ideas of religious … Continue reading Wittgenstein on Ethics and Faith

A Subtle Deceit – Self-Evidency and the Declaration

  What sorts of things are self-evident? In logic, propositions are generally divided into two types: analytic and synthetic. Most analytic propositions contain subjects that necessarily entail the predicated attribute and are therefore tautological. For instance, “all bachelors are single” is an analytic proposition because the subject bachelor already denotes the quality of singleness ascribed … Continue reading A Subtle Deceit – Self-Evidency and the Declaration

Surprised by Failure: C.S. Lewis on Art and Desire

Of all my boyhood memories, one particular kind of youthful sensation remains especially vivid in my mind. As a child I frequently experienced moments of intense longing that I can best describe as artistic desire. I would respond to this nebulous urgency by gathering together an assortment of art supplies – crayons, colored pencils, pastels, … Continue reading Surprised by Failure: C.S. Lewis on Art and Desire

Nietzsche on Nature’s Law

In the March and May issues of First Things David Bentley Hart considers whether natural law theory can persuade secular opponents of the authority of Christian ethics. How, he asks, can Christian apologists convincingly appeal to nature in defense of specific moral obligations without first seeking agreement on the metaphysical principles that permit of a … Continue reading Nietzsche on Nature’s Law

Book Review: The Closing of the American Mind

Now twenty-five years old, Allan Bloom's The Closing of the American Mind (Simon and Schuster, 1987) remains a timely analysis of the demise of liberal education in America. Despite the impact his controversial appeal for educational reform made upon the academic community, it's difficult to argue that in the quarter century since the book's publication we've made significant … Continue reading Book Review: The Closing of the American Mind